Chilling Tales Shared In 'The Weir' PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 10 October 2016 18:36

If you’re the type who likes their chill factor raised via slasher films or undead supernatural TV shows, the latest South Bend Civic Theatre production — "The Weir"— won’t seem overly frightening.

The Weir  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreWhat the award-winning work by Irish playwright Connor McPerson will do is provide you with an evening of solid performances and frequently familiar characters whose easy banter reveals a universal connection.

Under the direction of Scott Jackson (one of the Michiana areas’s best!), "The Weir" focuses on the interaction of two regulars, one returnee, a newcomer and the bartender in a pub in northwest Ireland. Named for the low dam that regulates water level controlling the small town’s electricity, The Weir also serves as a safe haven for the men of the village.

The Weir South Bend (JN) Civic TheatreGathered in its familiar confines are the owner, Brendan (Marlon D. Deleon); Jack (Bill Svelmoe), a mechanic and owner of the local garage, and Jim (Ed Walin), another regular who cares for his elderly mother. They are joined by Finbar (Driscoll), a prosperous real estate broker who has just rented a house to Valerie (Dorea Britton), a young woman from Dublin.  

Over a pint (or more), they share the events of their day and, as Jack puts it, “Bullshit about all and nothing.” Tales of local events and residents somehow slip into stories of experiences with the supernatural. Each of the regulars has his own encounter to recall but the one shared by Valerie is the most chilling, being obviously her own real, and painfully recent, experience.

The Weir  South Bend (IN) Civic TheatreThere is not much physical action in “The Weir,” but the emotional currents run with increasing swiftness and, as the focus shifts from one to another, the truth of Jack’s statement “There is no dark like a winter night in the country” becomes chillingly real as does the fact that the warm lights in the Weir offer each at least a temporary shelter from the wind that blows incessantly, providing an increasingly ominous underscoring of the world outside..

The strength of the production is in the performances. Each of the actors takes hold of his/her character and delivers a realistic and sometimes painful look behind the universal exterior. Relationships are revealed, restated, renewed and begun before the last lights in The Weir are shut off for the night.

There is a relaxed and easy camaraderie between Jack and Brendan that speaks to a real friendship. Jim, the third point in the triangle, seeks equal footing but is somehow frequently the odd man out. Finbar, who never forgets his economic status, is more the outsider than the new girl in town and the hostility between he and Jack is frequently palpable.

All the players are relaxed and easy with their roles, with Svelmoe perhaps the most riveting as he lets go of his initial bravado to tell of a lost love. All are perfect examples of “less is more.”

Sam Jones scenic design sets the locale immediately and the sound design by director Jackson is almost a sixth character.

“THE WEIR” plays Wednesday through Sunday in the intimate Warner Theatre in the theater at 215 W. Madison St. For performance times and reservations call (574) 234-1112 between 3 and 6 p.m.

Last Updated on Friday, 14 October 2016 03:19
 

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